Earth Science Displays

Earth Science Displays

The department hosts a number of visual displays within our buildings that highlight various mineral collections and geological themes. These displays are open to the public during business hours for viewing and appreciation.

 

 
Mineral collections in Cascade Hall.Mineral Collections: 1st and 2nd floors, Cascade Hall, and 1st floor Columbia Hall. The Department has on public display extensive collections of museum-quality mineral specimens. The vast majority of these were donated by collectors or their heirs, and most mineral groups are represented. One case is located in the main entry to Cascade Hall, three others are in the main hallway on the first floor of Cascade Hall, adjacent to the Goles Meteorite Collection, and a fourth on the second floor of Cascade Hall, across from the main conference room. Another two cases of display-quality material are in the hallway of the first floor of Columbia Hall.
Volcanology Display: This display, on the first floor of Cascade Hall features several particularly nice specimens of volcanic rocks, including pumice, pahoehoe, obsidian, welded tuff, mingled magma, and vesicular basalt, against a photographic backdrop showing the interior of North Sister Volcano which has been revealed by glacial erosion.Earth Science volcanology display.
Earth Science surveying display.Surveying, Then and Now Display: This display, in the hallway of the 3rd floor of Cascade Hall, features many of the tools of “old-fashioned” surveying, including a hard hat, compasses, a theodolyte, a plumb bob, and an altimeter, set against a backdrop of a modern digital elevation model derived from satellite measurements.

Cascade Courtyard: The courtyard surrounding the fountain in the courtyard of Cascade Hall is itself a geology display. It was originally intended to consist of just dark grey basalt stepping stones set among red bricks but as construction proceeded, many faculty members in the Department donated specimens from their personal and research collections to add greater diversity. Happily, the contractor agreed to incorporate them and set them in concrete as construction proceeded. In all, 67 such specimens are included including a particularly rich variety of coarse-grained metamorphic rocks, some fossil-bearing sedimentary rocks, and a wide variety of volcanic rocks. A map identifying these specimens is available PDF iconhere for download.  Please be aware that this map is original and unfortunately many of the samples have been vandalized or stolen.